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Request for Proposals for 2021 Montana Pulse Crop Research and Marketing Program

The Montana Pulse Crop Committee invites proposals to fund market development projects and educational projects designed to address Montana's pulse industry. All funding awards will be determined by the Montana Pulse Crop Committee or the USADPLC Research Review Committee. Generally, to qualify for consideration, proposals must have practical, near-term application involving practices or organizational arrangements that will stimulate an expanded pulse industry.

Click here to view/download the complete Request for Proposals (RFP) for 2021 Pulse Grants (PDF format).

Proposals submitted under the Montana Pulse Crop Marketing area must be received on or before March 1, 2021 at 5:00 p.m. by the Montana Pulse Crop Committee. Proposals must be submitted through the online WebGrants application portal at fundingmt.org. Instructions on using Webgrants can be found in the files below:


Proposals submitted under the Montana Pulse Crop Research area are to be submitted through USADPLC Industry Research Proposals, and are due on or before December 4, 2020.


Peas, Dry Beans, Lentils and Chickpeas


Montana's Pulse Power Play

Pulses are a leguminous crop that are harvested solely for the dry seed. Dried beans, chickpeas, lentils and peas are the most commonly known and consumed types of pulses. These little nutrition nuggets play a huge role in healthy diets in countries all over the world. They also are a powerful versatile crop the Montana farmers can use to promote biodiversity, improve soil health, and generate income from local and global markets.



Health

  • Pulses are a source of plant based proteins, amino acids, antioxidants, fiber and essential nutrients like Iron, Potassium and Folate.
  • Pulses are low fat, cholesterol free, sodium free and gluten free.
  • When eaten regularly, pulses may help reduce the risk of obesity, heart disease, diabetes and certain types of cancer.

Fields

  • Pulse crops utilize soil moisture efficiently. These crops require little (if any) nitrogen fertilizer; instead they fix nitrogen from the air into the soil.
  • Pulse crops help break disease and pest cycles in wheat and barley. When a wheat or barley crop follows a pulse crop it can experience substantial rotational benefits, improving yield and quality.
  • Pulse crops are versatile, drought-tolerant and frost-hardy, adding flexibility to cropping systems. If growing conditions turn dry, pulse crops can be harvested or grazed for forage or terminated to conserve soil moisture - the soil will still benefit from nitrogen fixation, rotation, and having a cover crop.

Graph: Pulse acreage in Montana growing over time, 2013-2017.Contact agrcsdit@mt.gov if you require accommodation.

Economy

  • In Montana, farmers have incorporated pulse crops into their crop rotations to reduce the amount of land left fallow (idle). Pulse crop acres have increased from 350,000 in 2009 to over 800,000 in 2015.
  • In 2011, Montana took the lead in U.S. pulse crop acreage. As of today, Montana retains its leadership position in pulse production, selling markets through the nation and in India, Japan, and many other countries around the world.
  • Potential exists for substantial growth of the pulse industry in Montana in the coming years. If additional acres of pulse crops were grown on 25% of Montana’s fallow cropland (approximately 900,000 acres) the annual benefit to Montana's economy could exceed $240 million. As the pulse industry grows, Montana communities will benefit from job creation and increased economic activity resulting from additional in-state processing.

Because Montana’s economy, farmers, and communities have so much to gain from expanded pulse production, the Montana Department of Agriculture seeks to help increase growers’ understanding of pulse crops, marketing opportunities, and profit potential. The department works to attract more buyers and processors and encourage the expansion of existing companies, with the goals of increasing delivery points and in-state processing so that Montana farmers benefit from a strong marketplace.


Put Montana Pulses On Your Plate, In Your Field, and In Your Pocketbook Today!

Buyers

Interested in buying pulse products from our Montana farmers? Check out the Montana's Pulse Potential page to get connected with Pulse Farmers across the state of Montana.

Producers

Are you ready to incorporate pulses into your farm portfolio? Check out the Marketing and Production Info page for information on how to make pulses part of your product diversification strategy.

Consumers

Do pulses sound like a delicious way to improve your health? Check out the Why Pulses Are Super Foods page to learn how to cook with pulses and make them part of your healthy lifestyle. Share your pulse pics, recipes, and more using these Pulse #Hastags: #lovepulses #healthyeating #recipe #pulses #MTag

Montana Pulse Advisory Committee

The Montana Pulse Market Development Program was created by a vote of Montana pea, lentil and chickpea producers following a process outlined in the Agricultural Commodity Research and Market Development Enabling Act. Check out the Montana Pulse Advisory Committee page to learn more about the committee and what they do to address Montana's pulse industry needs and opportunities.


Contact


Agriculture Development
and Marketing Bureau

Montana Department of Agriculture
Phone : (406) 444-2402
E-mail : agr@mt.gov
Fax : (406) 444-9442
302 N Roberts
Helena, MT 59601


Ask a Question


Pulse Crop News


USDA Announces Garfield County as Primary Natural Disaster Area due to Drought

USDA Secretarial disaster designation makes farm operators in Garfield County and other contiguous MT counties eligible for assistance through FSA

USDA Announces Garfield County as Primary Natural Disaster Area due to Drought

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated Garfield County as a primary natural disaster area due to a recent drought. This announcement comes nearly a week after 13 other Montana counties were declared as primary natural disaster areas due to a recent drought. 

Other MT counties previously named primary disaster areas: Carter, Custer, Daniels, Dawson, Fallon, McCone, Phillips, Prairie, Richland, Roosevelt, Sheridan, Valley & Wibaux.

According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, these counties suffered fromm a drought intensity value during the growing season of 1) D2 Drought-Severe for 8 or more consecutive weeks, or 2) D3 Drought-Extreme, or 4) D4 Drought-Exceptional.

Seven additional counties were named as contiguous disaster areas in the announcement for Garfield County: Custer, McCone, Petroleum, Phillips, Prairie, Rosebud & Valley.

Other MT Counties previously named contiguous counties: Blaine, Fergus, Garfield, Petroleum, Powder River & Rosebud.

A Secretarial disaster designation makes farm operators in primary counties and those counties contiguos to such primary counties eligible for assistance provided through the Farm Service Agency (FSA), including emergency loans. Producers in affected areas are encouraged to work with their local FSA office to receive more information and apply. Click here to view Montana FSA offices map. Click here to visit the USDA Disaster Assisance Programs website.

Montana Department of Agriculture Reminds Montanans to Sow Safe Seeds

Buying and planting seed from licensed dealers protects Montana from invasive species

Montana Department of Agriculture Reminds Montanans to Sow Safe Seeds

As people across the state gear up to plant their gardens this spring, the Montana Department of Agriculture (MDA) is reminding growers about the importance of buying and planting seeds from licensed seed dealers to protect against invasive species and plant diseases.

“Spring is such an exciting time for agriculture in Montana, from our farmers and ranchers out in the field to the folks planting gardens in their backyard,” said Director Mike Foster. “Along with this excitement comes a responsibility to look after our state by purchasing seeds from trustworthy sources. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to our Department to ensure that your seeds are safe before planting them.”

Last year, residents in all 50 states received unsolicited “mystery seeds” through the mail that originated in China causing federal and state agencies to urge recipients not to plant them, and to contact their state regulatory officials to submit them for testing or dispose of them instead. Close to 150 seed packages were received in Montana and sent to USDA’s Animal and Plant Inspection Service (APHIS) for testing. A mix of ornamental, fruit and vegetable, herb and weed species were discovered and fortunately determined not to be severely hazardous. In this case, the unsolicited seeds appear to have been sent as part of a brushing scam designed to boost e-commerce rankings for companies by shipping items to unknowing individuals and then creating false profiles and fabricated positive reviews.

Whether it be as part of a brushing scam or otherwise, planting unknown or unsolicited seeds can introduce harmful pests and/or diseases. To ensure your seeds are safe, please:

  • check to confirm the seed species information is printed on the seed package
  • do not plant any seeds of unknown species or origin
  •  verify seed suppliers are licensed in MT at mtplants.mt.gov or call MDA at (406) 444-3144.

The Federal Seed Act and Montana Seed Laws require seed sellers and distributors to plainly label their packages. The MDA Seed Program ensures that seeds offered for sale in Montana are truthfully labeled for identity, purity, and viability. To learn more, visit the Montana Department of Agriculture’s web page at agr.mt.gov/SeedProgram.

Documents to download

USDA Announces Primary Disaster Designation for 13 Montana Counties due to drought

Carter, Custer, Daniels, Dawson, Fallon, McCone, Phillips, Prairie, Richland, Roosevelt, Sheridan, Valley & Wibaux counties designated as primary natural disaster areas due to drought

USDA Announces Primary Disaster Designation for 13 Montana Counties due to drought

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 13 Montana counties as primary natural disaster areas due to a recent drought. 

Primary Counties: Carter, Custer, Daniels, Dawson, Fallon, McCone, Phillips, Prairie, Richland, Roosevelt, Sheridan, Valley & Wibaux.

According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, these counties suffered fromm a drought intensity value during the growing season of 1) D2 Drought-Severe for 8 or more consecutive weeks, or 2) D3 Drought-Extreme, or 4) D4 Drought-Exceptional.

Six additional counties were named as contiguous disaster areas. Contiguous Counties: Blaine, Fergus, Garfield, Petroleum, Powder River & Rosebud.

A Secretarial disaster designation makes farm operators in primary counties and those counties contiguos to such primary counties eligible for assistance provided through the Farm Service Agency (FSA), including emergency loans. Producers in affected areas are encouraged to work with their local FSA office to receive more information and apply. Click here to view Montana FSA offices map. Click here to visit the USDA Disaster Assisance Programs website.