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Export certification assures that commodities and plant material meet the phytosanitary requirements of importing states and countries. Phytosanitary measures seek to prevent the spread of harmful pests and diseases. The Montana Department of Agriculture assists exporters in meeting standards by certifying that plants and plant products are free of prohibited materials.

Some export destinations require multiple field inspections during a growing season, laboratory tests, soil analysis and completion of other testing requirements before export certifications can be completed. Exporters should contact the department before a commodity is ready for shipping to determine the phytosanitary requirements for the intended destination. Most countries require issuance of a phytosanitary certificate. Without the certificate, commodities can be detained, refused, or even destroyed at the importing destination.


Exporter Responsibilities

  • Establish a USDA APHIS PCIT (Phytosanitary Certification Issuance and Tracking) account and fund a pre-pay account to cover fees, web address: https://pcit.aphis.usda.gov/pcit/, or use the contact information on this page to contact the Montana Department of Agriculture (MDA) for assistance .
  • Apply for phytosanitary certification services through the PCIT system, or by using the Application for Growing Season Field Inspection of Plant Commodities for Export form available from MDA. Applications may be emailed, mailed or faxed. Applications must be received within 30 days of inspection.
  • The exporter must export plant and plant products within the time limits prescribed by the importing country. If the importing country does not prescribe a time limit, the general rule is that inspections must be conducted within 30 days of shipping. See the Phytosanitary Certification page for more information.
  • Provide treatment if required. The certifying official should be contacted prior to treatment to assure that the treatment is appropriate to satisfy foreign phytosanitary import regulations. The certifying official will arrange for supervision of the treatment.
  • Safeguard the shipment prior to shipping.

Contact


Ian Foley
Commodity Services Bureau Chief

Phone : (406) 444-9454
E-mail : IFoley@mt.gov
Fax : (406) 444-9493
302 N Roberts
Helena, MT 59601


 


Larry Krum
Seed Potato/ Produce Program Manager /Anhydrous Ammonia

Phone: (406) 444-5419
E-mail: LKrum@mt.gov
Fax: (406) 444-9493
302 N Roberts
Helena, MT 59601


 


Patricia Wherley
Plant Pest Specialist / Export Certification

Phone : (406) 444-5517
E-mail : PWherley@mt.gov
302 N Roberts
Helena, MT 59601


Export News

Grants Available through the Montana Agriculture Adaptability Program (MTAAP) for Food and Ag Businesses Impacted by COVID-19 Crisis

Up to $10,000 available to small and medium-sized food & ag businesses intended to create additional economic activity and bolster food security

Grants Available through the Montana Agriculture Adaptability Program (MTAAP) for Food and Ag Businesses Impacted by COVID-19 Crisis

Montana Department of Agriculture, Montana Food and Agriculture Adaptability Program

Click Here to Apply


Grants are available to food and agriculture businesses to help increase community resilience amid the COVID 19 pandemic and other economic disruptions. Grants are intended to create additional economic activity and bolster food security. Examples of eligible projects include, but are not limited to, those focused on accessing new markets, projects which strengthen and expand local food systems, and other business adaptations that decrease food and agricultural waste. The need for such innovations must be driven by the COVID 19 pandemic. Total funding available is $500,000, with a maximum application amount of $10,000.
mtaap@mt.gov

 

USDA NASS Prospective Plantings - March 1, 2020

Montana Highlights

USDA NASS Prospective Plantings - March 1, 2020

As of March 1, Montana growers intend to plant 135,000 acres of corn for all purposes in 2020, up 20,000 acres, or 17 percent from last year's plantings, according to the March 1 Agricultural Survey conducted by the Mountain Regional Field Office of the National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA. The area expected to be seeded to oats, at 75,000 acres, is up 5,000 acres from a year ago. Growers intend to plant 1.01 million acres of barley in 2020, up 90,000 acres from last year's actual plantings. If realized, this would be the highest barley planted acreage since 2003 when 1.15 million acres were planted.

All wheat acreage is expected to total 5.47 million acres for 2020. Winter wheat seeded last fall for harvest in 2020 is estimated at 1.60 million acres, down 400,000 acres from the 2019 crop. Growers intend to seed 570,000 acres of Durum wheat this year, up 20,000 acres from last year. Growers intend to seed 3.30 million acres of spring wheat this year, up 400,000 acres from last year. If realized, this would be the highest spring wheat planted acreage since 2002 when 3.75 million acres were planted. Hay producers in the State intend to harvest 2.80 million acres this year. This is down 200,000 acres from the acreage cut for hay in 2019. Montana canola producers intend to plant a record high 175,000 acres in 2020, up 25,000 acres from 2019. Flaxseed producers intend to plant 80,000 acres in 2020, down 19,000 acres from last year.

The area planted to sugarbeets is expected to be up 700 acres from last year's actual plantings to 42,500 acres. All garbanzo beans (chickpeas) area planted is expected to total 139,000 acres, down 60,000 acres from 2019. The acreage of small chickpeas is expected to total 56,000 acres and the acreage of large chickpeas is expected to total 83,000 acres this year.

Lentil acres planted for 2020 are expected to total 315,000 acres, up 20,000 acres from last year. All dry edible pea area planted, which includes Austrian winter peas, is expected to total 495,000 acres, down 35,000 acres from last year.

Governor Bullock Increases Capacity to Transport Critical Supplies

Ability of commercial motor carrier vehicles to ensure a supply of food, medical supplies, farm inputs and feed and hay during the COVID-19 emergency increased

Governor Bullock Increases Capacity to Transport Critical Supplies

MONTANA – Governor Steve Bullock today implemented actions to increase the ability of commercial motor carrier vehicles to ensure a supply of food, medical supplies, farm inputs and feed and hay during the COVID-19 emergency.

The Directive is not in response to shortages of food supplies. Montana’s food supply chain is essential and state and federal food safety inspectors are on the job. Additionally, licensed food manufacturers are operating and plan to continue operating at or above capacity. At this time, any shortages of food observed in grocery stores is temporary.

“By creating some flexibility for transport and deliveries during this challenging time, we can ensure Montana’s supply chain remains strong and food and medical supplies can get where they’re needed most without delay,” Governor Bullock said.

 

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